Q&A: Laurel McKenzie, InkMasters Cairns

From top:
Rhonda Campbell, Tropical Wetlands i, 2016, monoprint with collograph and chine-collé
Anna Eglitis, Rainforest Morning, 2016, hand-coloured linocut
Laura Castell, Our Wasteland, 2016, linocut
Harry Robertson, The Kraken Hunt ii, 2016, linocut

Who: InkMasters, Cairns

What: Flavours of the Tropics

Where: Vivo, 49 Williams Parade, Palm Cove, Cairns

When: Until 20 March

 

Q. What was the inspiration and process behind curating Flavours of the Tropics?

LM: Inkmasters is committed to creating exhibition and career-enhancing opportunities for its members, and Vivo (at Palm Cove, on the northern beaches of Cairns) is located in a holiday destination, in a very tropical environment. As many international and interstate visitors see the exhibitions in this space, it seemed appropriate to showcase not only the print-based works of our members, but something of the experience of being in a tropical environment. The concept of ‘flavours’ could relate to many things – not just food of course – but the ethos, the up-sides and down-sides of being in the wet tropics, the natural and the social environment.

Q: The prints are both colourful and rich, yet offer an ethereal quality – were there key themes and styles you were specifically looking for while curating?

LM: A broad spectrum of print media, styles and approaches, representative of the sorts of works being done by local artists, was sought. The theme was outlined to members, and responses to that theme invited. As expected, people responded in quite diverse ways. The way artists use colour in this environment does tend to be responsive to the richness and saturation of colour, and the sharpness of shadows, in the natural environment – even the way people dress tends to be more colourful.

As to ethereal qualities perceived in the works in this collection, I can only suggest that this reflects the temperaments and working methods of the artists involved. Tanya and I looked for confident and thoughtful individual statements, but specific stylistic leanings were not uppermost in our thinking.

Each artist has a direction in their individual practice, but when called upon to address a theme, as in this exhibition, they find ways of incorporating their ongoing interests with the specific challenge of the topic at hand, which can lead to innovation and even to new directions!

Q: What do you hope that people who visit the Flavours of the Tropics exhibition take away with them after they leave? Was there an intended message in the exhibition that you wished to portray?

LM: I hope that visitors will appreciate the depth of artistic ability and the diversity of skills that the far north Queensland artists in this show possess. These are (mostly) small prints, but they are strong and engaging statements about the ‘flavours’ of this particular locality.

– Megan Hanrahan