Q&A: Keith Lawrence

Clockwise from above:
Janet Goldman, Red Kimono, linocut
& chine colle, 72 x 53 cm
Clare Humphries, Once, and again 2, 
linocut hand burnished
etched glass, 27 x 30 cm,
variable edition of 10
Joel Wolter, The Silent Theatre, 
etching, 30 x 22 cm (image),
69 x 59 cm (framed),
edition of 20

What: Editions annual exhibition

Where: Tacit Contemporary Art, 312 Johnston Street Abbotsford, Vic

When: until 26 February

IMPRINT: Editions has become a go-to event for Victorian printmakers. What is the genesis of the show?

KL: Five years ago, Melbourne printmaker Stephanie Jane Rampton was invited to curate a small group show following an accident that resulted in her having to postpone a solo exhibition with us. But we moved to our current building that is four or five times bigger. That small exhibition of half a dozen or so Melbourne friends with 20 works became the front three galleries and 19 artists with 65 works. That was 2013.

The following year I co-curated with Stephanie as we looked to diversify geographically and artistically. It also became the entire building rather than just the front galleries. I took on responsibility, along with Tim, the overall gallery curator, in 2015: it was strategic for Tacit to build direct relationships with artists and the print world. An open submission was introduced last year to diversify even further and reach new printmakers.

IMPRINT: The work is incredibly diverse. Have you been surprised by the range this year?

KL: Editions strives to celebrate the diverse aesthetic qualities inherent within printmaking media, a celebration of tradition while embracing contemporary innovations within the printed form. A now established exhibition of such scale provides a safe platform for artists ranging from emerging to more established to explore new and exciting print processes and approaches to image-making. That platform also provides the opportunity to exhibit multiple works from current practice, providing audiences with a greater understanding and insight of where the printmaker is ‘coming from’.

The now five editions of Editions have featured intaglio, relief and lithography in a range of substrates and printed on a range of surfaces covering diverse subjects, challenging audiences in their understanding of what exactly is a ‘print’.

IMPRINT: Would you say you’ve contributed to a resurgence in printmaking?

KL: From the outset, Editions provided a commercial outlet that reaches beyond the multiple print focussed galleries by respecting print as print objects within an exhibition context. Past Editions have provided, for example, opportunities ranging from the screen-printed paperbags of Carolyn Hawkins spanning a five metre wall, the light-box installation of Georgina Whish-Wilson whilst still providing an opportunity for the small delicate works by Stephanie Jane Rampton or Shane Jones.

As an exhibition that celebrates Victorian printmaking, Editions has featured a high percentage of regional-based printmakers – particularly from the Goldfields area. It’s an important, high-profile opportunity for increased exposure to these artists. Similarly we look to include recent graduates from the tertiary educational establishments, providing increased opportunities early in their art practice.

Tacit prides itself on the presentation and curation of the work and Editions has now firmly placed itself on the Victorian printmakers cultural calendar.

IMPRINT: What are some of the most striking or original works you have seen since Editions first launched?

KL: What we’ve always enjoyed is that juxtaposing of traditional techniques expertly done (I’m thinking the absolute control of multiple-plate printing by Damon Kowarsky, Kyoko Imazu or Hyun Ju Kim) alongside more innovative approaches (the minimalism of Louise Blyton’s silk screens and T. J. Bateson’s massive multiplate linocuts or Clare Humphries, whose work is addressing both the optical and material potentials of the picture plane).

Pete Gurrie in 2015 presented a 3D printed matrix whilst Paula McLoughlin last year explored CYMK dot matrix in reference to printing history. Within a supportive educational environment facilitating experimentation, graduate work has included the large-scale silkscreen printing on sheet metal by Ying Huang or the incorporation of human hair into the etchings of Scarlett Mellows.

It’s that balance of a mix of the traditional and the contemporary that we’re searching for. But ultimately we like to push the hand-constructed multiple in a digitally saturated world, celebrating the manual, the labour, the craft. Upon visiting the exhibition, we want visitors to be overwhelmed by the sheer sense of labour and time-spent that is worthy of celebration and respect. Editions celebrates the artist and the art.

– Andrew Stephens

Q&A: Terry McKenna

Top: Richard Steiner Birds Ears, 2001, Mokuhanga water based pigments on torinoko paper, 46cm x 31cm

Above, clockwise from right:

Terry McKenna Evening Glow on Impossible Building, 2015, Mokuhanga water based pigments on kozo paper, 23cm x 35cm, Ed. 15; Konomi Honda Man’s Shirt, 2015, Mokuhanga water based pigments on washi, 40cm x 51cm, Ed 10; Tuula Moilanen Six Dreams of Ukiyo Beauty: Speed, 2009, Mokuhanga water based pigments on kozo paper, 28cm x 42cm, Ed. 36

 

Below: Richard Steiner Birds Ears, 2001, Mokuhanga water based pigments on torinoko paper, 46cm x 31cm

 

What: Kyoto Hanga – mokuhanga works by Masahiko Honjo, Konomi Honda, Tuula Moilanen, Richard Steiner and Terry McKenna

Where: East and West Gallery, High Street East Kew, Melbourne

When: 9 February-25 March

Q: What is mokuhanga and why is it rarely seen in Australia?

A: Mokuhanga is the traditional water based woodblock printing technique of Japan, most famously seen in Ukiyo-e prints such as Hokusai’s Great Wave. Outside of Japan it has generally been difficult to learn and to access tools and materials, while top practitioners have tended to exhibit mainly within Japan, often due to language barriers. These factors have made it relatively rare to see quality contemporary work here.

Q: There is a wide range of artists being exhibited – please tell us about Richard Steiner and your work with him?
A: Steiner is a senior practitioner, having lived and worked in Japan for more than 50 years. Only a few other Westerners have lived continuously immersed in traditional art forms for such an extended period. Spending an extended period working with him was a great entry into the world of mokuhanga. While training with Steiner I was able to broaden my technical skills, meet a range of other practitioners and craftspeople that would be otherwise impossible to meet as a visitor, hear lots of interesting stories about the mokuhanga world and its characters within Japan, and experience collaborative ways of working. Being immersed in Japanese life and culture was a great experience for me.
Q: How has your own work evolved since you met Steiner?

A: I see a definite development in complexity and skill over the years. This medium in particular requires practice to master and I see a gradual increase in the level of complexity, with colours, carving and print effects particular to the medium. Thematically my work has been wide ranging as Stiener encouraged me to experiment.

steiner-birds-ears-web

Q: What other influences are important to you?

A: A significant influence on my current body of work “Ballarat Hakkei” is the historical use of this theme in Chinese landscape painting and Ukiyo-e. The Eight beautiful views (Hakkei) are a set of eight themes that I have adapted to explore my responses to returning to live in Victoria after many years abroad. Originally stemming from the enforced solitude of exile, the themes have been given an ironic twist in my work.

Q: Do you see strong connections between the artists in this show?

A: Steiner and Moilanen have a long standing collegial relationship, while Honda worked for Steiner as a printer in his workshop. Honjo, for a time ran Marugo Gallery in Kyoto and has relationships with a broad range of printmakers there, so everyone knows each other, although their work remains somewhat separate. I selected them because of this – to showcase a variety of work, origins and approaches. Steiner’s work stems from the Sosaku Hanga (Creative Print) movement, through his teacher, Honjo is the product of a traditional workshop situation of professional carvers and printers producing a leading artist’s works, Moilanen and Honda are both products of Seika University although at different times and origins. In short, the common ground is the medium of mokuhanga. There are many other mokuhanga artists at work in Japan, in the future I hope to stage a more comprehensive exhibition that can showcase the amazing variety that is possible with this medium. – Andrew Stephens

Q&A: Damon Kowarsky

Top: Paul, etching and aquatint from two copper plates, 22 x 25 cm, 2012.

Above: Jeffrey, etching and aquatint from two copper plates, 13 x 19 cm, 2010

Above, right: Michael, etching and aquatint from two copper plates, 13 x 19 cm, 2010

Damon Kowarsky won the Grand Prize for the Midsumma Men on Men art competition (alongside Scott Thomas, who won People’s Choice). Kowarsky’s etchings are showing at the Laird Hotel. Megan Hanrahan finds out about his process.

 

Q: What were some of the foundation ideas for your work in your new exhibition, Exposed?

The exhibition was a result of a competition earlier in the year, the Men on Men art competition, which involved work about masculinity, and the winner got an exhibition at the Laird, a men-only pub. I picked a selection of work from the last five years that were all portraits of men as I felt that was the most appropriate response.  It is the only male-only pub in Australia, and one of a few in the world. Now, it may not seem so important, however if you look back to the early ’80s when there was a huge amount of stigma against gay men, and the rising problem with HIV, it retains its role as a special space where men who are perhaps still uncomfortable with their sexuality can go. The bulk of my work is architectural and landscape, so this was a chance to have 10 or 11 portraits that fitted together in this exhibition but hadn’t [been] seen before.

Q: The prints have a lot of strong texture – can you explain some of the technical processes at work?

I nearly always work with two-colour or two-plate etchings, so a dark black or brown and then a blue or red as a second plate. I was shown a technique where you lay down an aquatint and then draw into it with chinagraphic pencil, or a waxy pencil, and that wax resists the acid. Etching can be an indirect drawing, but in this way you get the soft crayon marks you perhaps might associate more with lithography, but you get them on an etching plate. That, plus the combination of the two plates, is what picks up the textures. I am always pushing the boundaries of what that particular technique will give. Two-plate etching is reasonably difficult enough if you’re interested in coherent registration, but there is still a lot of scope for exploration.

Q: Do you have a conscious preference for waist-up portraits? Can you elaborate on what prompts this or what you like about it?

I am much more interested in portraiture than drawing the full body. A part of that is how it fits onto the page. There is a long tradition of a head-and-shoulders bust portrait going back to the Renaissance and long before that as well. It gives some clues about the body and the person, while still remaining strongly a portrait, which is much more my interest than drawing nudes. I am interested in who the person is and my relationship to them.

Q: Do you work from life with the people in your portraits? What is the process?

Yes, absolutely. I typically will make a pencil drawing of the subject, and then if I am satisfied with that I will transfer that drawing onto the etching plate. To me that’s really the only way it will work. It’s always a challenge to draw a portrait, and that’s a good way to learn and develop skills. We live in an age where photographic portraiture is everywhere… it can be done so easily, so taking the time to do something that requires practice and skill has a value. There is also a political element – I don’t think the world should only be viewed through the lens. Our eyes were the primary way we looked at the world for a long time, and understood the world, and I think there is also value in that.

Q: What are the sorts of feelings or emotions you would hope to prompt with these works?

I want them to enjoy looking at it. It has got to be interesting to them, and visually rich, and then they are free to develop any ideas they want from it afterwards.

Q: What drew you to art and printmaking? Was the process of creating fostered in you as a child, or did you discover it later in life?

 It was certainly always there when I was young, my mum did drawing when I was a child, and we had a close family friend who was a designer back in the day when that meant a room full of pencils and watercolours, cutting knives, ink, paper and all the kind of things that don’t exist in the design world anymore. I loved the sense of craft that he had. And then I started making art when I as a 19-year-old, and fell in love with printmaking. Printmaking felt the most natural. I liked the combination of craft, and the ability to be artistic and experimental. With printmaking, you need to rely on techniques, but you can push them as far as you want. – Megan Hanrahan

Exposed: Damond Kowarsky and Scott Thomas

The Laird Hotel, 149 Gipps St Abbotsford

Until February 3

2016 PCA Print Commission Q&A: Rujunko Pugh

Rujunko Pugh

Why do you make art?

The art world is the best-suited field for how my brain is wired. I first tried to make a career out of science, but with that choice I found that I was continuously unfulfilled and unhappy. Initially, I went in the more analytical direction, because I thought it was the best way for me to give back to society. After being fully involved and invested in the arts now for many years, I have discovered that it could also be used as a tool to evoke questions about important issues.

Within the art world environment is where I feel the most comfortable. I remember when I took my first art-history, survey class after switching from science to art. When we covered biographies of some of the artists, it was the first time I could truly identify with others in a specific occupation. I knew then and there that art was for me.

Lastly, from a more romantic point of view, when I make art from start to finish, the process is effortless. When I am in the zone, space and time cease to exist. Ideas occur and materialize before my eyes. I love everything about it, like creating a composition, piecing together the signifiers, constructing a visual language, selecting the materials, prepping a screen, printing on paper, etc. It is so satisfying that I almost feel guilty and indulgent when I make art.

What’s your relationship to printmaking?

I practiced photography for several years and printmaking seemed to be the natural progression. My main medium is screenprinting, and a lot of what I do is digital. I love the technical aspect on the computer, but the real pleasure is applying the ink onto paper. My obsessive-compulsive side comes in handy when it comes to registration. I have to say that I have only been screenprinting for about 5 years now, so I still have a lot to learn. I am slowly getting to know the printmaking community in Sydney and how incredibly generous they are with their time and knowledge. Recently, I learned a lot about etching from a talented printmaker, Janet Parker-Smith, who works at Sydney College of the Arts, and hope to utilize this new skill in some future work.

How did you get interested in printmaking?

Before I moved to Sydney, I lived in Washington, D.C., where I met Kristina Bilonick, the founder of Pleasant Plains Workshop, an art incubator and gallery. Pleasant Plains hosts a residency for artists, who all happen to be screenprinters. I was fortunate to become one of them after taking a screenprinting lesson taught by Kristina. Being part of the artists in residence group was a great experience. My colleagues all had good creative energy and strong printmaking skills. It was fun and motivating, and I learned a lot.

How did you approach making your submission for the PCA Print Commission?

I had already developed the graphic style of the kimono figures with the gas masks while enrolled at SCA in the Masters of Contemporary Art coursework program and chose the PCA Print Commission as an outlet to take it further. With the piece for the print commission, I experimented with the appropriation of decorative Japanese textile patterns from the 19th century and the use multiple layers of colours.

Whose work have you been enjoying lately?

I am loving are so many artists right now, but I’ll only mention a couple: Lorna Simpson’s new work in a solo show at Salon 94 Bowery in New York and Tony Albert’s Ashtray series. Both artists make smart use of imagery in their work to convey themes of identity and social politics that are so important and relevant today. For Simpson’s show, she uses multimedia including screenprinting to showcase her signature serial style to create works that poetically illustrate the tumultuousness of the black, human condition in America. Albert’s etchings for his Ashtray series are a disrupting commentary on the troubling portrayal of Aboriginal people in Australian history and society.

Where do you go for inspiration?

My Japanese and African-American heritage is a huge source of inspiration. It wasn’t a big topic in our household growing up, so I have had to do some self-investigation, which started at the beginning of my MFA research. There is so much new information out there about identity, which is currently being re-examined in terms of the art historical context from a global perspective. For example, Kobena Mercer just published Travel & See through Duke University Press about “black diaspora art practices since the 1980s”. His reinterpretations and analyses of black artists’ work from the past to present feeds into my own work and research.

I also find inspiration on social media and am a big Instagram fan. I follow museums, galleries, and art magazines and journals from around the world. Online museum databases are also great to peruse. It is incredible how much is publicly available and accessible. Additionally, going museums and gallery shows is extremely useful. To see the artwork in person and its materiality in context to my own work helps me with initiating ideas.

What are you working on now?

My next major effort will be toward finishing my MFA degree at Sydney College of the Arts at the end of February 2017. I am writing a research paper and developing work for my graduation exhibition. This is pretty much consuming my life at the moment.

To view the 2016 commission prints visit the PCA website

2016 PCA Print Commission Q&A: Senye Shen

‘My work is my experience of “being-in-the-world” and my inspiration comes from the observation of the everyday environment.’

Why do you make art?

My ongoing interest is to unveil the essence of things – what sustains the visible world that becomes the core of my practice. My work is anchored in nature; and it is through visual sensation of movement to invite viewers into communion with infinite things, and to raise consciousness of ever-changing flows all around us.

What’s your relationship to printmaking?

Installation, drawing and printmaking are part of my practice. Mostly, my drawings and prints are generated form my installations. It is about transferring an experience of installation from 3D into 2D, which often offers a different outlook that is quiet fascinating to me. And my work is realised in the space between representation and abstraction.

How did you get interested in printmaking?

Compare to drawing, printmaking has a great advantage on the notion of repetition and reproduce. Particularly, my print involves multiple plates; while variation can be achieved once few plates are completed. And my prints are very much emphasising this repetition of differences, it is a perfect medium for it.

How did you approach making your submission for the PCA Print Commission?

Trace IV is part of series that explore interference between lines and movements through different medium, instead of using copper plate or lino block, I chose woodcut this time, for the block already comes with embedded marks by the nature.

Whose work have you been enjoying lately?

Japanese visual artist Ryoji Ikeda’s work intersects science and nature by using data as material and theme, and to investigate the potential to perceive the invisible multi-data flow that is endlessly circulating in our mediated world. New York artist Julie Mehretu’s large-scale drawing-paintings reveal an ever-changing battlefield that signal a kinetic metaphor for a political world.

Where do you go for inspiration?

My work is my experience of “being-in-the-world” and my inspiration comes from the observation of the everyday environment, such as the circulation of air, the shifting of lights, and the whisper of the wind.

What are you working on now?

I have just posted two print installations (Drift 1 & Shifting Field) to London, as I am a finalist in the 2016 International Print Biennale in UK, which will be launched at Great North Museum at Newcastle University on 15th September. And as mentioned above, inspired by Julie Mehretu’s drawing-paintings, I consider returning to painting and making painting-installation one day, instead of making installation or print installation.

To view last year’s commission prints visit the PCA website

Q&A with Rilka Oakley, Curator at the Blue Mountains City Art Gallery

‘It is easy to put a bunch of art in a gallery but to tell a good story with artworks is the challenge. The marker of exceptional art is the impact on the viewer – when I am physically affected or emotionally moved by a piece of art I feel compelled to include it in an exhibition.’ 

Rilka Oakley has been working in curatorial positions and arts administration since finishing her arts degree in Printmaking in the mid-1990s. She completed a Master of Art Administration from UNSW COFA in 1997 with an internship on the Australian exhibition fluent at the Venice Biennale. She worked at the Biennale of Sydney on the 1998 and 2000 editions in curatorial, venue management and catalogue management roles; she worked at Ivan Dougherty Gallery as Curator from 2000 until early 2009; and most recently at Blue Mountains Cultural Centre, Katoomba as Curator since October 2012.

How did you become interested in art and prints in particular?

I have always loved art – colour, texture, form, line, image – I like the way things fit together, or not. I am really drawn to contemporary art and this includes printmaking.

With regard to prints in particular I majored in printmaking at uni – I had done some in high school but it wasn’t until uni that I really got to understand the beauty of printmaking. I love the depths of black you can achieve with etching. The layering. The repetition. The textures. The image reversal. I particularly liked monotypes.

By the time I finished my undergrad I really wanted to work with other people’s art as much as make my own so I studied art administration and began working first at the Biennale of Sydney and then as Curator at Ivan Dougherty Gallery in Paddington. I continued to do my own art making and completed a Masters in Printmaking in 2004.

How do you view the role of curator?

For me a curator’s role is to bring out the best of an artwork, and in some cases an artist. Often as a curator I am solving problems – finding solutions to making an exhibition look the best it can. This isn’t so obvious with many exhibitions but with installations or other unique approaches to art there isn’t always an easy way to display the work.

I enjoy curating group shows and creating a conversation between works. I find it is the same creative energy that goes into curating as goes into art production. There is an urge to bring things together to illustrate a theme. It is also an intuitive process – it needs time and contemplation to get it right. It is easy to put a bunch of art in a gallery but to tell a good story with artworks is the challenge. The marker of exceptional art is the impact on the viewer – when I am physically affected or emotionally moved by a piece of art I feel compelled to include it in an exhibition.

What are some of the challenges you’ve faced while working as a curator?

The most challenging thing for me is working between the requirements of an institution and the vision of an individual artist. It’s like being an interpreter at times – making an artist’s vision possible within the constraints of budget, safety and time.

Can you tell us a bit about what a working day looks like for you?

My days can vary greatly depending on the stage of exhibition development. At the moment I curate three to four exhibitions per year and assist on installs for the other exhibitions in the gallery, so at any given time I will be dealing with all stages of development at once.

If I am curating a show then I work from a theme, I chose the artists and the works and then take the whole exhibition through to completion. In the early stages of exhibition development I might be out visiting artist studios and looking at lots of work. At other stages I will be doing a lot of administration: preparing loan agreements, sending emails, organising freight, discussing logistics. If it is an install week then I am in the gallery: painting walls, unpacking crates, condition reporting and physically hanging artworks. So you can see there is a lot of variety.

Who are your role models?

Victoria Lynn was an early role model in the 1990s. I interned with her at the Art Gallery of NSW where she was the Curator of Contemporary Art and I then travelled to Venice with her, Brenda Croft and Hetti Perkins to help with the installation of the exhibition fluent in the 1997 Venice Biennale. All three are amazing women and exceptional curators. I find I refer back to their exhibitions/styles/insights/sensibilities a lot when I am making curatorial decisions.

The other person who significantly influenced my career is Nick Waterlow. I first felt moved and excited by contemporary art when I saw his 1986 Biennale. I never thought I would end up working with him, but as it turned out I spent a significant amount of my career with him both at the Biennale of Sydney in 1999-2000 and then at Ivan Dougherty Gallery in 2000-2009 where he was Director. One thing in particular I learnt from him was how to see the good in an artwork that you might not personally like. He could see the point of what an artists was trying to say even if he didn’t care for the style. He could get to the essence of an artwork – see the artist’s thought process. He had a brilliant way with artists.

Often with a group show (not curated but a prize for example) the curator has no control over the content, and yet we have to install the exhibition and make it look wonderful. Nick was able to do this effortlessly by engaging with the intent of the artist and not being shy about placing bold works together. He taught me to tackle an exhibition head on, to deal with and appreciate the many different styles of art, not just my personal preferences.

Can you tell us a bit about the process of putting together Tracing the Line?

Curating Tracing the Line was lots of fun. It has been a journey through fifty years of Australian printmaking history. I discovered that the Print Council of Australia’s commissioned prints reflect and document the changing trends within print processes from the mid-1960s to date. The inclusion of photo etching and screenprints in the 1970s, heat transfer and colour copies in the 1980s through to the use of laser and inkjet printing in the 1990s and digital prints in the 2000s, finishing with a print on steel in 2015. The collection traces the development and progress of printmaking techniques across the five decades since its inception.

It also struck me that there was always a continued presence of the more traditional print processes. The skill and commitment printmakers have for techniques such as lithography, etching, aquatint, mezzotint, linocut – the appropriation of new technologies and processes has not replaced the traditional print process – it has simply given printmakers more tools to choose from.

Tracing the Line, curated by Rilka Oakley, is an exhibition of fifty works selected from the Print Council of Australia’s collection of over 500 Australian prints. As part of the PCA’s fiftieth anniversary celebrations, it opens following the Hungry Eyes symposium (Art Gallery NSW) at the Blue Mountains Cultural Centre on 22 October and will be on display until 4 December.

2016 PCA Print Commission Q&A: Katy Mutton

‘I am a terrible fiddler – I often end up with smaller editions than I intended because I feel compelled to play with the prints – draw and paint on them, cut them up and create collages.’

Why do you make art?

I’ve always made art, it’s a compulsion. Art is everywhere and the process of making is integral to my understanding of the world. It’s literally kept me alive and enables endless new experiences.

What’s your relationship to printmaking?

I love printmaking – the process and the reveal are magical to me but I enjoy working in many different ways. I am a terrible fiddler – I often end up with smaller editions than I intended because I feel compelled to play with the prints – draw and paint on them, cut them up and create collages.

How did you get interested in printmaking?

I have always loved to draw and printmaking always felt like a natural extension of that practice. I made my first prints in high school, they were linocuts. I still remember how much I enjoyed making each mark and cutting back the surface. I loved them so much and still have those original linocut plates.

How did you approach making your submission for the PCA Print Commission?

In 2015 I was working on a series of acrylic paintings exploring tessellation techniques and pattern. I was really pleased with the final works, they were a true labour of love, I spent so much time working and reworking the layers. When the commission call-out came up I was talking with a friend and we both thought one in particular would work well as a screen-print. It was important to me that all eight colours were retained for the print edition as the transitioning colours, across geometric forms, add an illusory quality to the piece. The final version was eight layers but it was definitely worth the additional effort to keep those colour shifts.

Whose work have you been enjoying lately?

I admire many different artists for many different reasons.

I saw some fantastic linocuts by Ryan Presley on a recent trip to Darwin at MAGNT. I admire the work of Alison Alder who first taught me to screenprint at the ANU, Sally Smart, Michael Schlitz and Tony Albert. I probably relate to multi-disciplinary artists most particularly, as my work frequently transverses mediums.

Where do you go for inspiration?

My practice is heavily research based and I love to read. Living in Canberra I am fortunate to have access to many National Cultural Institutions who hold incredible collections. In the last year I’ve spent a lot of time researching at the National Library of Australia and had collection access at the Australian War Memorial – fantastically inspiring places to explore.

What are you working on now?

I have been working on a series of large screen-printed posters works, which portray contemporary military aviation in different contexts as a means to explore the politics behind Australia’s defence investments. I am also beginning to work on concepts for a series of lithographs and installation works, which I hope to develop over 2017.

Katy Mutton was the recipient of the Artspace Residency as part of the 2016 PCA Print Commission. Join us at Artspace before the Hungry Eyes symposium for drinks and a private viewing of the exhibition and studios on Thursday 20 October, 5.30–7 pm.

To view this year’s commission prints visit the PCA website, pick up a copy of the spring 2016 issue of Imprint (Vol. 51 No. 3), or visit one of the participating venue galleries listed below:

2016 PCA Print Commission Q&A: Gwen Scott

‘I have spent years appreciating prints and printmaking and have collected a lot of Australian printmakers work but now it’s my turn to produce some of my own prints, I’m loving the deep and meaningful relationship I have with mixing up the inks, printing and getting surprised!’

Why do you make art?

Creating and appreciating art has always been part of my life. The process of creating something brings a lot of joy, calm and relaxation. I use colour a lot because that’s what really attracts me. Mixing and splashing paint or ink around is a lot of fun. Losing all sense of time and concentrating on something so intensely (but more often obsessively) is something that I enjoy doing.

Raised by artistic parents I saw my parents spend long periods of time in their studios and so was influenced greatly by their lifestyle, creative processes and joy of art.

What’s your relationship to printmaking?

I have spent years appreciating prints and printmaking and have collected a lot of Australian printmakers’ work but now it’s my turn to produce some of my own prints. I’m loving the deep and meaningful relationship I have with mixing up the inks, printing and getting surprised!

How did you get interested in printmaking?

Through books on Rembrandt and William Blake and seeing prints by Lionel Lindsay, Thea Proctor, Eric Thake, Margaret Preston and Barbara Hanrahan at the Art Gallery of NSW when I was a teenager. My appreciation of printmaking has been ongoing for decades but my practice of it is more recent.

My practice didn’t manifest itself until well after art school. I did the compulsory semester of printmaking but it didn’t inspire me, so I majored in painting and drawing and spent numerous years after art school practicing painting, drawing, needlepoint tapestry and mosaics. Over the years I did revisit my rudimentary printmaking skills through workshops and short courses. However, the dedication and time wasn’t there. It wasn’t until 2010 when I had the time to focus on doing more and playing around with colour that I got hooked.

After retiring from working as a librarian for over twenty-five years, the last two and a half years have been spent developing my skill with linocutting and the reduction technique. The problem-solving aspect, the use of colour and the surprise effect you get using the reduction technique fascinates me.

How did you approach making your submission for the PCA Print Commission?

I had been working on a new body of work on the theme of Pomona and just worked further on that for the PCA commission. All the prints in this new series are colour reduction prints, so my intention was to produce a reduction print if selected. Initially, I submitted three prints that I liked the best from my new series for the first round of judging. Then when I had to produce a bon a tirer (B.A.T.) I chose to do a detailed colour gouache on paper in the dimensions of the intended print. Along with the gouache I submitted a Pomona print that I had done previously to show evidence of my work. Finally, I set about completing the artist’s proofs and the edition together as this was the only way I could do my reduction print unless I wanted to do it twice!

Whose work have you been enjoying lately?

A trip to Sydney this year to see the Grayson Perry show was a treat but discovering the work of an African artist El Anatsui at Carriageworks was even more inspirational. His large-scale installations of repurposed materials are sublime and at the same time tragic, a commentary on human waste and resourcefulness.

Where do you go for inspiration?

My immediate environment provides a plethora of motifs to work from so it starts there and the simple act of walking a few kilometres provides a wealth of imaginative ideas. Also, art books, art galleries and museums, the internet, music and film. My favourite interests are: surrealism, english landscape painting, the arts and crafts movement, animal art, early european tapestries and roman and greek mosaics.

What are you working on now?

A small edition for the PCA Inaugural print exchange, an edition for Australian Print Workshop‘s Impressions show as well as a solo show at the Boulevard@ Montsalvat in November.

To view this year’s commission prints visit the PCA website, pick up a copy of the spring 2016 issue of Imprint (Vol. 51 No. 3), or visit one of the participating venue galleries listed below:

2016 PCA Print Commission Q&A: Rochelle Summerfield

‘My first love of printmaking was etching and collagraphs printed as intaglio. I loved the rich textures and depth of tone. I discovered collage, and print matter generally, and have developed photography and digital skills. With a love of both classic media and digital technologies, combining these skills seemed quite a natural evolution.’

Why do you make art?

I feel happy when I draw and make art. It enriches my life and gives it meaning. It helps me work out how to see and be in this world – it is my way of connecting.

What’s your relationship to printmaking?

To me, printmaking is a variety of methods, skills and approaches – textures, marks, tonal properties, everyday print matter and mass media – that I can draw upon to make work.

How did you get interested in printmaking?

I began exploring printmaking as part of my degree at Southern Cross University. My first love of printmaking was etching and collagraphs printed as intaglio. I loved the rich textures and depth of tone. I discovered collage, and print matter generally, and have developed photography and digital skills. With a love of both classic media and digital technologies, combining these skills seemed quite a natural evolution.

Who is your favourite artist?

I will have to say three artists in particular – Arcimboldo, Hannah Höch and Max Ernst. Arcimboldo for teaching me how to make pictures as puzzles – through his work I realised that was how I see the world! Hannah Höch for teaching me a way to make pictures about women that are relevant now; and Max Ernst for teaching me how to combine collage within a background, in works such as his famous surrealist novel in collage Une Semaine de Bonté.

Where do you go for inspiration?

Several places generate inspiration for me. When I make work, I find collage stimulates new ways of looking and thinking about things and not just cut-and-paste, collage-type processes. Living in Seelands and looking right onto the mighty Clarence River with its wonderful birdlife has been a source for inspiration and renewal.

In my practice I find artist residencies are really good for inspiration, being in a new place and talking art with other like-minded souls (families can get quite sick of that type of talk!) For new ideas on what is happening in art beyond the regional I look at contemporary artists’ work, installations in metropolitan galleries and online.

What are you working on now?

I am working on drawings for a site specific installation. It’s going to be a billboard, so is extending me and my work in scale. It will be installed in Victoria Park, as part of ‘Future/Public’, Artlands, Dubbo 2016. I am one of ten artists selected for an exhibition of propositional public artworks to be on display in various venues for the Artlands Regional Arts Conference, 27–30 October, 2016.

To view this year’s commission prints visit the PCA website, pick up a copy of the spring 2016 issue of Imprint (Vol. 51 No. 3), or visit one of the participating venue galleries listed below:

2016 PCA Print Commission Q&A: Pia Larsen

‘I make art today because I continue to enjoy the challenge of synthesising ideas through materials, process, time and place.’

Why do you make art?

I come from a family for whom making art, and living with art, is a way of life. I grew up in a creative environment and learnt early on how to work with ideas from one state to another. I make art today because I continue to enjoy the challenge of synthesising ideas through materials, process, time and place.

What’s your relationship to printmaking?

I have been using printmedia since childhood and its complexities and qualities have been formative for my work in print and other mediums.

How did you get interested in printmaking?

At Kinma Primary School I had a brilliant art teacher, Angelika. Her approach was non-hierarchical and encompassed sculpture, lino, batik and screenprinting, as well as field trips to places such as Long Reef, where we gathered ‘found objects’ (rubbish) to arrange in a large bed of plaster.

How did you approach making your submission for the PCA Print Commission?

My submission consisted of three works. Two were completed during an artists residency in the US at the Women’s Studio Workshop, October–November 2015. The third image, from 2016, juxtaposes two paper milk carton objects with digital images printed on the surface, also created during the residency. This work plays with scale and uses time and place to explore the geo-politics of the US.

Whose work have you been enjoying lately?

I have been looking at Cindy Sherman’s work and her latest incarnation of female archetypes; Baldessari and David Noonan for their use of overlay and appropriated images; and Kiki Smith as a woman artist who uses a broad range of processes and has interesting things to say about being an artist and the context in which she works and lives.

Where do you go for inspiration?

I look at artists’ work online and visit exhibitions around Sydney and interstate. I read across a range of topics and listen to programs on Radio National that explore philosophy, politics, religion and the day-to-day lives of Australians, and people from around the world.

What are you working on now?

I’m working on bottle objects in paper with watercolour/gouache that reference the US flag, its colours, pattern and potent symbolism. They will be exhibited in a group show with Charles Cooper and others, to coincide with the outcome of the US election in November, at SLOT Space in Redfern, Sydney.

To view this year’s commission prints visit the PCA website, pick up a copy of the spring 2016 issue of Imprint (Vol. 51 No. 3), or visit one of the participating venue galleries listed below: